EP 5: What Makes a True Innovation Leader? w/ José Pires

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Leaders do not have the ability to predict the future, no matter how transformative their leadership might be.

An innovative leader isn’t distinguished by perfection but by understanding the inherent contradictions of these 4 pillars of greatness: ideas, methods, technology, and people.

In this episode, Jose Pires, Founder & CEO at Global Excellence & Innovation, sits down with Unleash IT host Claudine Bianchi, to discuss the attributes and strategies of transformative leadership.

 We talked about key features of enduring organizations, practical applications for technology innovation, how CIOs can change culture, the need for value creation, collaborative leadership, and human relationship skills

To hear this interview and many more like it, subscribe to the Unleash IT Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or our website.

One of the key features of this great and during organizations and the very successful transformations that they go through is they have become masters of contradictions. Welcome to unleash it, a podcast where we discussed the experiences and ideas behind what's working in enterprise architecture and digital transformation within the IT landscape. Unlock Your Business has digital capabilities. Transform your enterprise architecture. Unleash it. Let's get into the show. Hi and welcome today's episode of Unleash I T. I'm very happy to welcome today's guests. Just Se Petz, who's the CEO of global excellence and Innovation, and I hope it just says that I'd pronounced your name right or correctly, and nail, you sound like native, so that was perfect. Loud of Portuguese. That's right. I'll tell you a little bit about the background and that that becomes a nice conversation point. Yet what is your background? Tell us a little bit about where you've come from and what are you doing now with your company. Let's talk a little bit about that. First of all, thank you for having me on the on the show and the great to be part of the Lena x community and the be able to contribute to that. I'm originally from Brazil. That's why I say Joseppier is opposed to Joseppirez, but to us, to me. I live in San Antonio, Texas, and a lot of people call me Jose and but just a little bit of background for the Audists who may not know me. I'm originally from Brazil. I grew up in Brazil as educated United States. My background is in engineering, physics, investment, banking, entrepreneurship and run academic standpoint. And then my first job was actually working for Sony Electronics in Japan. So I always tell people that I was super exciting and highly confused. But my career really evolved as a leader of excellence and innovation for pretty wellknown companies. I started as a design engineer for Sony and then I joined a startup companies in the semiconductor industry in California. The really revolutionize semiconductor manufacturing to this day. We create a new technology based on x summer lasers that was very successful. After we acted that company, I was the innovation leader for Nestlet, the Food Company in North America, and then the remaining of my career the next fifteen years plus I spent on the energy business, but all is with this common theme of a creating ecosystems for culture, business and digital transformation, and we were very successful and building award winning approaches to culture, business and digital transformation over thirtyzero excellence and innovation leaders that I have personally trained more than a hundred organizations in more than twenty countries. So everything that I'm going to share here is not something that you know came from a book, although a lot of the theory and concepts do come from books and great research that was done before. But what I want to share with the audience today is a real practical approach for excellence in Innovation, acceleration for Culture, business and digital transformations. And now start by saying that you know, this concept of the visionary leader, that I can predict the future is largely a myth and that and what I'm going to share is the real experimentations and experiences of this Thirtyzero plus excellence innovation leaders that don't have the ability to predict the future. But what they do very well is that they experiment often they find what works and what doesn't work. Once they identify what works, they understand why it works and then they scale that so and they're very successful by doing that and then so this very practical approach to transformation is what I'm going to share today, and it's based on those experiences and the understanding what works, why it works, and then how they scaled that to become great and during organizations...

...and really great leaders. So everything I'll talk about would be really in honor of those leaders who have, I have learned so much from by their own experiences. Yea, to you mention that you have a very wide portfolio companies you work with. What are some of the the actributes of these organizations that have helped them transform and it helped them the kind innovation masters? I love that. Love that. That's the essence of the key, the key differentiator of what I would call greatness. So now, first of all, it's important that we understand the context. Here. I'm going to be talking about greatness and when it comes to greatness, it's very confusing because the world of greatness is filled with seemingly contradictions. Forces they're pulling very different directions. So forces like excellence and innovation that pulling very different directions, and organizations, things like purpose and discipline. Things like the deployment of high technology and the need for deep human connection, of trust collaboration come on purpose. So this seem like contradictions, and one of the key features of this great, enduring organizations and the very successful transformations that they go through is they have become masters of contradictions. They understand that greatness is not an or world, that greatness is an and world forces pulling different directions, and to achieve greatness is not about balancing those forces, about finding the right blend of those forces. So, for example, I'll talk about the foremost important things in a transformation and then I'll tell you how they don't matter very much in some cases, and that so talk about the importance on ideas, methods, technology and people, as just one example. Ideas are very important, but at the same time as ideas are everywhere. What are in common our people in organizations. They will help with that transformation, people who are willing to put their reputation behind those ideas. Now then I'll talk about methods and I'll share with you that I'm up certify links six sigma master black belt. But for most people, for most people, that sounds like I have a dangerous mental condition, Claudine. It doesn't help them, because methods are very important because they provide a discipline framework for innovation execution, as an example, a discipline framework for your transformation. But methods alone do not transform businesses. People do. And then, of course, in this contexts here of technology, will talk about technology and we'll talk about how important this exponential technologies are today, RPA and pl natural language process and and LP AI, the cloud. All the technology is incredibly important and at the same time they can be highly destructive and inappropriate, because technologies can be like new romantic lovers. There are super exciting in the beginning. You're like, Oh, I want to use that out for everything. It solves one problem in the short run, but in the long run creates like ten different problems that you didn't expect. And so again, even when it comes to technology, you have to love it, but you also have to be careful about how you deploy it. And then, lastly, and all the people right, we say, okay, so it must be the key ingredient for success and greatness must be then people, and I'll say one side of me say yes, in the other side will say no, because although we must include everyone. One of the key features for great and during organizations in successful transformations is that they are able to identify, not all day engage all the people, but they have very clear mechanisms to identify the right people in the organization. And the right people are those amplifiers of innovation, are those value creation leaders who have a combination of purposed passion, discipline and resilience to execute innovation and technological implementations at scale, and that's really a key success factor on those transformations, identify those amplifiers and then leveraging them in your transformation. So again, the mastering of this contradictions is very important. There's...

...not like you know you do this and you do that. The world of greatness is an and world that that requires you to blend this seemly contradictions to advanced your transformation successfully. He's think that like the shiny new toys like our PA AI and the practical applications of that, and sometimes we think about the the most advanced it organizations in particular being the ones of the most advanced technology. That isn't necessarily true. It's really about, I think when you're talking Aban is really bring innovation, but in a business value format, so you actually contributing to the company's overall success. We fell in love with the technologies out there, we look, we fell in love with the potentials, but then we really don't see the practical applications and how that's going to help us drive revenue or save costs or mitigate risks. So can you explain something that that balancing between ideation, innovation and really the business practicality, you know, especially within this contexts and greatness? Oh, that's a fantastic question, because that's at the at the core of greatness, what you just talked about. So you know the reason why? One point I decided that, you know, if I'm going to create a company, I'm gonna call it excellence and innovation. And why is that? And the reason for that is because the it's a big contradiction excellence innovation or forces pulling different directions. In the world of excellence, it's all about setting performance standards and meeting and exceeding those performance standards. It's about squeezing efficiencies out of the existing systems and to achieve greater performance. That is great, but if the only thing that you do is that, over time you become obsolete if you do not innovate. And then people get very attracted by innovation and and honestly, even the beginning of my careers like all innovations right it is. I Love Technology, I love innovation. The Great and during organizations must be the most innovative organizations right, right now. Know, the evidence does not back that up. If you actually look at thousands of organizations and the ones who became great and during organizations, they are not the most innovative. This is quite complex. I'm not saying innovation is not important. Innovation is critical and absolutely necessary for you to be a great, enduring organization station. But what happens is that most organizations that go into the path of pure innovation they fall in love with technology, they fall in love of innovation for its own sake and they lose their purpose quite often. So without a clear purpose, and what an if you do not have the discipline to innovate with consistency with your purpose, you're going to scatter away and your innovation is not going to create the value that you expect. So the question becomes, so how do I do this? Because you know what you're telling me here is was a if find in the horse business I should use excellence tree squeeze efficiencies out of the horses. was like yeah, and then you're going to be Oh, I got you, because you don't get to design cars by squeezing efficiencies out of horses. You have to innovate. And I'll say yes to both. And that is the difficulty, because this excellence in innovation forces pulling different directions. They create a lot of friction organizations because the mindsets are different for excellence and the mindsets for innovation. And the question becomes, how do you blend them successfully? And what great and during organizations do is that they understand their business. They understand how values created. And, by the way, this also means that the enterprise architectural leaders under our value creation leaders. They are not just technology leaders and they are squeezing efficiency out of their systems, they are meeting and exceeding performance standards and and at the same time they step away from it and they they look at it from different perspective, and sometimes that can be a technological perspective, sometimes that can be a business model perspective, but they look at the excellence that they have from a different perspective. And they ask the question there's got to be a better way, not just a five percent or ten percent better way, but a fivefold or tenfold better way, a real breakthrough innovation. And he is the catch when they come up with that, and it could be driven by technology, it could be that I have a new algorithm that changes...

...the business model that completely is a breakthrough for the for the organization. So once they have that little innovation, what they do better than everybody else is that they don't fall in love with that. They figure out how to scale the innovation they created better than anybody else. And how do you scale innovation? You is scale innovation by applying discipline, excellence approaches to the innovation that you created. So again, those contradictions of excellence and innovation are fundamentally critical for the achievement of greatness. But it is how you actually blend excellence and innovation in what you do. So excellence alone is not enough, innovation alone is not enough. You must have developed excellence and you must question that innovate. And then the way that you become dominant is by scaling that innovation better than your compattern and you scale that with excellence, which is a discipline approach to innovation, because innovation, after all, real innovation, is about value creation and it's a discipline approach. I love the quote from a designer who was a nice son and I think later on he moved to another company and Jared Herschenberg, and he talks about innovation is not an escape from discipline thinking, it is an escape with discipline thinking, and that is so powerful because that really summarizes the the great enduring organizations practice, which is scaling innovation and technology with excellence, with a very clear purpose, with a very consistent execution of their innovation road map, or innovation path, if you will. Yeah, so, this also then becomes relying on the people. So there's going to be a lot of change management. If you're bringing or you want to introduce your cio, you want to introduce more technical innovation within this Disness Paradigm, you have to change the culture around which you're working. Really yes, yes, so let's talk a little bit of all culture, right, you can see right here from my background, from how yeah so, so, as you imagine, culture is a very big deal, is very important. But the reality is that I fould approach most of organizations and I'll come in there and say, Oh, we need to change the culture. They would fire me and everybody who looks like me because they would be like what you're coming from? You're coming here telling us that we're going to change our culture, as we know, the same culture. Each strategy for breakfast and everything else that we're talking about here here is just a side dish. So, however, and this is a tricky portion, you have to be very empathetic to organizational culture. You have to meet them where they're at. And, by the way, this is a common mistake that technologists make because they are not empathetic to culture and they come in and say, Oh, you guys are so old school. Here's a new technology that's going to revolutionize everything and if you don't do that, you are a loser. Well, that's not a good way of starting your EA, your u a path. Right. So let's talk a little bit about culture here. So I think the and I want to talk from about culture from a very practical standpoint, not that there articles standpoint. will be spend months talking about that, arguing over that. So culture is about the behaviors there exhibit by the individuals and teams in the organization at a very basic level. That's what culture is. It's about behaviors and what you observe. Now what people say. Fine, so if that's culture, you have to first ask the question, what culture do I want to have? For one thing, that culture is always there. So you either intentionally shape the culture or it's always shaping you. So you have to become aware of or your culture is and then you have to decide I'm going to let it go and shape me or am I going to intentionally shape the culture that I want to have. But that is not a trivial answer. What culture do you want to have? And the best answer that I have learned from this practitioners is that that culture, answer in the type of...

...culture on I have may vary depending on the different business models you have in the organization. But ultimately, if I'm going to have a general answer to that question, it will be that you must create a value creation culture. And where the right culture is a culture that creates value, and that culture that creates values, not just financial value. It could be social value and there are other forms of value, but fundamentally a good culture it's a value creation culture. Okay, so if you have that in mind, then you have to start decomposing culture. And so if it culture is about behaviors, how do I get there? How do I transform this culture? Well, you have to understand that for those organizations that do it well, and we have been privileged to works with several of those who have been very discipline and understand culture very well and transformed successfully. So, based on that, this is what it looks like. Number one, they have a very clear purpose, if beyond just a mission statement, they have a very clear purpose as an organization and why they exist. So they have a clear purpose. The senior leadership team has a common mental model of that purpose and that becomes a common purpose for the organization. Very important. Then, as a result of that, they have a strong set of core values associated with that, with that purpose, those strong set of core vettues are the foundation of their the guidance for their behaviors. As a result of that, they develop very specific beliefs and mindsets about their purpose, about their core values, and they develop this belief and mindsets. So, for example, if I want to create a culture of Edie creation, that in my context means a culture of innovation. I need to have innovation mindsets. I need to have innovation beliefs, core values, so and so forth. Now, if you have those blocks, it's require, its necessary, but not sufficient. You still now need to go to the next level, which is you need to develop what your key principles. So, if I want to use innovation as an example, if trying to build a culture of innovation, you need to know what are the key principles of innovation, fundamentally understand innovation, define it, innovation in ordinary terms, so that you can drive extraordinary innovations. So you need to define what those key principles are. But that is not enough, because now you need to figure out it, because you're not a behavior as yet. So how do you go from principles two behaviors? And that is one that's very critical and I think that EA leaders and CIO's play of this proportional role in that one. Once you identify the principles that you want to have, you need to develop the mechanisms to translate those principles into action, and often this mechanisms can be governors, it can be systems, but it can also be technology systems. So you need to develop the mechanisms that translate the principles of innovation, as an example, into action. Now that you're talking about action, you're talking about new behaviors. You need to identify behaviors that drive value creation. And now, once you have that value creation behaviors, now you're redefining a culture of value creation behaviors. So, as you can see it, this is not simple because, first of all, most people do not understand this components, and even those who understand the components, they are a little bit overwhelmed about all the all the alignment and must exist in the Organization for this to be done successfully. It's a never ending journey. That's why, even the organizations that achieve greatness, very few of them remain great, because that's not easy to do. The with changes in leadership, with changes in the markets, organizations become inconsistent, and then that's another, another, another, if there is a tagline that would like to share with the audience, here is one from the research done on this. Organizations who become consistently great, which is really hard, and duringly great I should say in...

...the quote is that the signature of mediocrity is not a nonwillness to change. The signature of mediocrity is chronic inconsistency and chronicking consistency with what chronic in consistency with your purpose. As a matter of fact, that is so important. Called seen that we do when we work of organizations, historically and today, we talk to them about the definition of a discipline, because we'll talk a lot about discipline and when I talk about discipline of people they automatically think, Oh, there is Jose I with middle sort of are lining Susi, my master black belt, talking about US following a regiment and set of rules for everything. Not No, that's not it. Discipline is not about falling a regiment and set of rules. Discipline fundamentally is about being consistent with your purpose and consistency with purpose fundamentally defined discipline. And that is one of the hardest things for organizations, in individuals and CIOS and enterprise architectural leaders to achieve, to have that consistency with their long term purpose. Yeah, and it. And glad you brought up the consistency, because you can be consistent and something all of a sudden happens like that the pandemic we're in right now where all of a sudden you had been consistent and then push you know, the greatest laid plans weren't enough to keep some of these organizations or are highlighted that these organizations weren't resilient. So there's also this balance with resiliency and we talked about, you know, agile frameworks and agile within these organizations to to become much more responsive to the business requirements. But that's that's not an easy thing to do either. So you're balancing, you know, your alignment with the business, you know creating value, you're aligning with your purpose all the time, and then you still have to be resilient and agile. You know, have you have your the companies that you're working with. They seen that too. I mean, it's a tough balancing act, I'm sure. Oh, absolutely, absolutely. This this is a fundamental question, because what you say again goes back to those forces pulling different directions. How can you be consistent with for a purpose and discipline and edgile? Maybe you have to choose right between one or the other. And the answer is actually, when you're giving two options like that, you need to take both. You don't choose one or the other, you take both. And but how do you take both? And this is the key. So an agile organization at all level. It at the at the highest level and then, and maybe at the more at the micro level of agile projects and software development type of things. I'm talking about Agile at the broader context and Nagi Organization. The organizations that change most often are not necessarily the ones that become the grain and during organizations. Why is that? This is gonna sound like common sense, but common sense is the least coming of the senses in large organizations. And so there is this myth that if I change really fast, if I'm really agile, I'M gonna dominate the industry because my competitors are slow, so I'm going to dominate the industry. But the evidence does not show that. The EDGI organizations that change all the time, they often scatter because they do not change with a consistent purpose. And that's the key. You want to be agile as long as you're moving in the directional guidance of your purpose. If you're just being agile because it's cool to be agile, that's a recipe for disaster because you're going to have all sorts of distractions. They are creating the business. So again this is a little confusing because on one side I'll say you have to experiment often, you have to fail often to succeed sooner. You have to experiment on an ongoing basis, but your experimentation must be a line with your ultimate purpose as an organization, and this is the key. Make sure that you develop agility, but then you have to focus that agility towards the Directional Guidance and purpose of your organization and not just become agile because you can flex quickly...

...on things. That's a recipe for disaster and really a recipe for mediocrity. So you must develop again, contradictory forces. You must be a Gile and consistent with your purpose, and the organizations that do that they're the ones that scale. So on the context of the pandemic, that's the of course, that's a great context. What we have experience is that every organization has to make very large adaptations, but the ones they had a clear purpose, they have been able to adapt now much more easily, including when it comes to accelerating innovation, because they already had a portfolio, if you will, of innovation projects that were on the shelf because they were not right for the time. But now the pandemic hit and this organizations, I have a very clear purpose. It's very easy for them to go on the shelf right now and pick what are the right projects for us to work right now. There are aligned with our purpose in the context of this pandemic and they can make the decision quickly and they can move in the right direction post pandemic, while the other organizations, who could be like the most Edgi organizations that experiment quickly into all sorts of things very fast. They can transition very quickly to a digital world, if you will, HMM, but they are lost because they are digitized and now things that they don't even understand what the right direction should be. So this is this is complex, by the way, and hard for organizations and individuals to grasp to the fundamental principle of being agile and consistent with your long term purpose and strategies and so on, so forth. So the the best performing organizations, even now they're in the pandemic, are the ones by all means everybody transition to a new state. Because of there's has been an acceleration of what people called digital transformations, honestly, which is largely like remote work. People are figuring out how to use zoom and and how to do things remotely, and some people call that digital transformation. Fine, okay, but we both know digital transformation at scale is much more than that. And now the companies that had a clear purpose, but they had had the disciplanet approach for innovation acceleration for before the pandemic. Right now they're doing really well. They're actually bringing this this this initiatives in very clear what they want to chieve with those initiatives and they are actually scaling beyond just remote work. They are scaling their AREPA. There are scaling and LP's they are scaling, you know, blockchain. They are scaling a R Vr Xr. Call what you want, but they are scaling, not because it's digitaling cool, they are scaling it consistently with their purpose and and this technology is now just became enablers for the Road Map. So, you know, backing up a little bit, you know, you have to have a clear vision for your digital transformation, you have to have a road map for your digital transformation and then you have to have the agility to to adapt, but always with the consistent pursuit of the original vision. So the tools may change, but the consistent the decision making is very easy because you know which tools aligned with that purpose and which tools are maybe cool but they're not really aligned of the purpose. Right now. Yeah, yeah, now, you can't be a much more sophisticated person, you know, to deal with this. Are we experience, especially I look at the technology and technology innovation, is there a skills gap that we need to account for? I am not going to get the right people into the right jobs within its new digital transformed world. You know, it's a different quality of skills and different quality and experience. You know, what are your thoughts about? You know that changing people landscape within these digital transformed companies and organizations. That is critical. That is critical. So let's talk about that. So, first of all, if we're talking about digital...

...transformations and if we're talking about innovation and there is a technological component associated with that, which may not be the case, no, no, in a number of deployments, but often in the world that will live in today, there's some level of technology that's part of that. So there's a basic requirement of understanding the technology, what it can do and what he cannot do. Right as it is not the hype it's not. How Ay is transforming the world right now is understanding how sixty percent of AI implementations do not meet their outcomes and then understanding what are the forty percent that do amazing things for us today, and then knowing that in the future others, you know that percentage is going to increase, but you know, living in the real world, facing the reality of technology as it is developed today and what is ready for, and that having the technical background is important. So that's fundamental, but that's not going to make you the great EA leader, the Great Cio. The differentiator is really on having, on developing collaborative leadership skills, assolt value creation skills and human relationship skills. So I'll say that the if you ask me. Okay, so what does it look like? What is what does the EA leader that's most effective that looks like? Well, that individual is a highly effective collaborative leader who has and collaborative leadership is a topic all on its own, because sometimes people think the collaborative leadership is about developing consensus and being kind of a nice person. No, it's it's about then finding common purpose and actually getting people who don't even like each other sometimes to work together towards that common purpose. And and there's some specific skills and techniques and mechanisms for collaborative leadership. So one level is that you must learn those skills of collaborative leadership and practice them to become really good at them. Now that's not enough. You also must have a deep understanding on how value is created in the business priview. But most technical people is you ask them the question, how is value creating the business? They don't know, but they can tell you that if you use AI is going to create more value. How can you answer that question if you don't even know how fundamentally values created in the business? So that is another very important component. There is a financial skills, if you will, but I'll call them value creation skills because it's beyond finance. You need to really understand how things are done, not just how values created conceptually, how value is created in reality. So collaborative leadership skills value creation skills. And then part of collaborative leadership skills is developing very strong relationships with business leaders and becoming trusted advisors for those business leaders who, by the way, these things are all interconnected. Those business leaders are not going to take you as a trusted advisor if you fundamentally do not know how value is created in the business. So collaborative leadership skills, value creation skills are fundamental and prerequisites for developing a strong, solid relationship as a trusted advisor with business leaders. And, by the way, that is fundamentally how the great during our companies differentiate themselves from others. It's not about technology, even though technology is important. It's not about ideas, even though ideas are important. Is Not about methods, even though methods are important. It is about finding those people that I just describe the right people in this right people. They have a combination of this skills, okay, and then they have four behavioral traits, and this is very important. Some of it you're born with and some of it you can develop. But they have a combination of purpose, work, purpose that's a Ligne of the life. Purpose many that they're not just there just to make a buck. They found a job that's mean inful...

...to them. So there is an alignment of purpose. And next three are more personal characteristics. They have a tremendous love of passion for what they do. They have an incredible level of discipline and they are inherently resilient individuals. Purpose, passion, discipline and resilience are the traits that separate the true innovators, do true value creation leaders, from everybody else. Now the question is that how do you find those people in your organization and can you develop them or they're born? Well, it's a little bit, little bit of both, as it usually is the case in the when it comes to personal traits. But here is a deal. When I go into your organizations, I'm mining for gold, I'm mining for this people. I'm looking where they are at, because they are the key people in the organization that will become the amplifiers for whatever you're doing to be successful. And you only find these people in this is critical. You only find this people through the test of execution. They are not the high performance people from hr they are not the beings that the executive leaders put on a short list for the next future leaders of the organization. Know, the real leaders of innovation, for Vati creation are only revealed by the test of execution, of innovation execution. So with that, what do you have to do as a CIO? What do you have to do as a CEO of organizations that want to achieve great enduring organization, you need to create a clear meritocracy of ideas in your organization, but that's not enough. Associated with that clear merrortocracy of ideas, you must have clear mechanisms and execution mechanisms to translate the principles of innovation into Vatu creation. This is where you now have. I have an idea, but I also have very clearly how I vet that idea to be approved, to become part of the portfolio. Of those things that I'm going to experiment with there are aligned with the strategic goals of the organization and the purpose of the organization, and I'm working on a whole lot of different things, but they're all aligne of the purpose of the organization and out of that system, on the end of it, you're going to have great strategy execution, you're going to get great value creation and, most important, you're going to find the real leaders in the organization when it comes to transformation and when it comes specifically to innovation acceleration. This people now that succeeded that which, by the way, with thousands and thousands of professionals, very qualified professionals, around the world. It's the numbers are about twenty to twenty five percent of the self motivated individuals actually have what it takes to execute innovation and try to help transform the business. So the individuals, though, that come out on the other end of the funnel, if you will, of deliver vatue creation, deliver innovation, an acceleration, implement technology that create this proportional Vady for the organization, those individuals are the right people, are the special people, and if you look at them, you're going to find out that they have traits there that come down to your purpose, passion, discipline and residence, and you can spend a lot of time talking about each one of those traits. But those individuals are the amplifiers, Claudine, they are the amplifiers. And so although ideas, methods, technology and people are all important, the ultimate accelerator for Innovation and technology and organizations is identifying who those amplifiers are, identify who those value creation innovation leaders are, and they are only truly revealed by the test of execution, because what you find out is that ninety percent of technology for Vati creation, ninety percent of innovation for Vati creation is execution. It's not the idea, is not the technology. It's how you bring it together with collaborative leadership skills, value creation skills and all the skill development that takes place when you're actually executing. Now this didn't come about from again, from theory, even though...

...the theory is sounded. Daniel Conoman, when he wrote about about this, is a Nobel Prize winner in economics. He did some studies with military around the world and Israel and military specifically, and he found that the best warriors are not the ones there are the best in boot camp even, or the ones that you go through psychological profiles and they're super strong and they look like they're going to be the best warrior. And the quote that he used in his research, and I'll paraphrase here, is that the best warriors are only revealed in the theater of war. And I don't want to draw dramatic comparisons between innovation and war here, but there is a some similarities in the fact that it's very undefined. Innovation by itself is very undefined. The future. Nobody can predict the future. So when you're creating the future, it's similar to being a war zone. You don't know what's going to happen and it's not what you model before in your training. So the real leaders are only revealed by that test of execution. So your job as a cio, your job as a CEO, your job as a see anything, is to fold. One is to create a clear meritocracy of ideas with execution mechanisms and discipline approaches for execution that will reveal who these people are. And then, very important, you are responsible for creating an environment in your organization where great ideas and great people can connect, because for innovation tracceleration as part of an ecosystem, it's all about connecting seemingly disconnected dots and it's about creating an environment where great ideas and great people can connect. And that's another, you know, high level responsibility for the senior leaders and the organization. Yeah, that's when it comes down to making great people's connect with great ideas to make things happen, to absolutely, absolutely say in things. So much just say, if someone's to get in contact with you with some of your contact information. One of the things that's interesting about me is that you know, after you know, leading excellence, innovation acceleration, not as like of that advisor, but really from within organizations and having to live with the consequences of my advice and that I went on. I continue my journey. I decided that my goal is not to become the CEO of Fortune Fifty Company. What gives me a fulfillment is to accelerate innovation, collaborative leadership, development and verty creation at scale and working with great people and organizations around the world. So between now and the day I die, whenever the click goes off, I'll be doing this and there's no retirement from that level of fulfillment. I have been blest with finding that purpose alignment between work and life and it's not a balance. It's a wonderful blend when you find it. But wouldso with that. You can see me. I we actually document our journey off and on Linkedin. You can go on Linkedin and see the things that we're doing. You can see the the events, you can see the companies we're working with, the people that were touching with. Do a lot of mentoring as well. So join our conversation on Linkedin. We have a website, www and innovationcom, written now, and you can contact via email. Info at excellence and innovationcom, but really very easy to find US online. On linkedin specifically and see what's going on and the and engage in the discussions. Lean I X, we have had the pleasure of working with you on enterprise architecture conferences. We have a cultural transformation conference happening next week and organizations from all types, including a lean I x, joining that and and it's really wonderful because that's again, when you think at a micro level in an organization, it's all about a creating environments where great people, great ideas and great people can connect. At a macro level, this is what it's all about as well. If you want to change society, if you want to have an impact in the world, fundamentally we need environments like this one where great ideas and great people can connect. So I hope that you know, you and I are audience,...

...can connect further and with our ideas with other great people to advance, you know, verty creation for organizations, very creation for the world. Yeah, we'll keep the conversation going. Thanks so nice. Just thank you very much. You've been listening to unleash. I T to ensure that you never miss an episode. Subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player. If you'd like to learn more about enterprise architecture and tools to help unleash your businesses digital capabilities. Visit Lean ix dotnet. Thank you so much for listening, until next time.

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